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REUNION SCHEDULE

SATURDAY 9th February –

Newcastle Leagues Club in Newcastle West:  c.1pm  – 11pm 

17 National Park Street (between Hunter and King Streets and opposite ‘Spotlight’). Patrons of the club (including us) are able to use the Spotlight carpark across the street until around midnight. The Club has reasonably-priced Bistro.

From 12.30 pm onwards: Reunion registration at the auditorium  nominal  fee of $5 per head 

You will each receive a ticket and name tag which also shows the years you were in Newcastle as a student and/or teacher, etc.

Blank cohort sheets for each commencing year (1962 to 2018) will also be displayed in the auditorium for names and contact details

4.00 pm: Ceremonial Scattering of Ashes

(of photocopies of diplomas/degrees) in the nearby park, those ashes having been produced privately and brought along bagged for the occasion… all being done to symbolically lament the steady decline of Tertiary Art Training in Newcastle over the past 15 years or so. Maybe a minute’s silence will be observed as we do so.

4.30 pm: A large group photograph session in the park
– with partners and spouses having their cameras and smart phones at the ready to capture the seething masses…

Dinner – Obviously, some groups and cohorts (like the one of 1969 – the Cricketers Arms has ben booked for dinner) will head off to other venues they’ve pre-booked for dinner… but, hopefully, the diehards of all cohorts will eventually make their way back to the reunion dance at some point and make a memorable night of it!

7.30 pm to closing: An Art School Reunion Dance in the auditorium will get underway with the help of a disc-jockey playing CDs which you providof favourite music of the era/s. The auditorium has its own bar and the registration fee will stretch to cover the wages of the barman/maid on duty through the evening.

Sunday 10th February-

Breakfasts, Brunches, Lunches, Afternoon Teas… may all come under consideration and, who knows, different groups may well be bumping into each other over the course of the day. But, of course, some people will have long distances to travel home too… so, they may well have to leave the region quite early on the Sunday morning.A

(AS OF JANUARY 12th 2019)

SEE YOU AT THE REUNION!!! 


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Newcastle in the 1960s & 70s

50 Years Reunion Newcastle Art School

Do you have any photographs? Add them here or email me digital image/s and caption/s – barbara.aroney@gmail.com

Gritty City – Newcastle Steelworks c.1974
The Works on the Harbour
Newcastle Harbour c 1970
Newcastle Harbour
View of Newcastle c. 1970
Rail on Harbour c.1970

CHANGES TO THE REUNION SCHEDULE AS OF JANUARY 12th 2019:

SATURDAY 9th February –

Owing to Newcastle City Council regulations, the 1.00 pm opening venue for our reunion has had to be switched from Civic Park to the Newcastle Leagues Club in Newcastle West:

17 National Park Street (between Hunter and King Streets and opposite ‘Spotlight’).

Given the likely heat and humidity, such a forced change has its advantages; such that we can all be accommodated in the first-floor auditorium (with seating alone for some 150 people). Further, the Club has accepted our booking for the hours 1.00pm until 11.30pm!

All of which means that those cohorts unable to make last-minute dinner bookings can now take advantage of the Club’s very reasonably-priced Bistro offerings.

Patrons of the club (including us) are able to use the Spotlight carpark across the street until around midnight.

Briefly, the day now appears to be unfolding as follows:

12.30 pm onwards: Reunion registration at the front door of the auditorium (with a nominal registration fee of $5 per head to cover the hiring cost of the venue). You will each receive a ticket and be encouraged to affix a name tag to your shirt-front which also shows the years you were in Newcastle as a student and/or teacher, etc.

Blank cohort sheets for each commencing year (1962 to 2018) will also be displayed inside the auditorium so that names and contact details can be written in over the course of the day and night; effectively, these sheets will likely become a valuable archive for all concerned, both for now and into the future.

4.00 pm: Ceremonial Scattering of Ashes (of photocopies of diplomas/degrees) in the nearby park, those ashes having been produced privately and brought along bagged for the occasion… all being done to symbolically lament the steady decline of Tertiary Art Training in Newcastle over the past 15 years or so. Maybe a minute’s silence will be observed as we do so.

4.30 pm: A large group photograph session in the park, with partners and spouses having their cameras and smart phones at the ready to capture the seething masses…

7.30 pm to closing: An Art School Reunion Dance in the auditorium will get underway with the help of a disc-jockey playing CDs which you provide of favorite music of the era/s. The auditorium has its own bar and the registration fee will stretch to cover the wages of the barman/maid on duty through the evening.

Obviously, some cohorts (like the one of 1969) will head off to other venues they’ve pre-booked for dinner… but, hopefully, the diehards of all cohorts will eventually make their way back to the reunion dance at some point and make a memorable night of it!

SUNDAY IS SET ASIDE FOR COHORTS TO MAKE THEIR OWN ARRANGEMENTS:

Breakfasts, Brunches, Lunches, Afternoon Teas… may all come under consideration and, who knows, different groups may well be bumping into each other over the course of the day. But, of course, some people will have long distances to travel home too… so, they may well have to leave the region quite early on the Sunday morning.

ANYWAY,

SEE YOU AT THE REUNION!!! 

*************************************************************************************

The Art of Lynne Sinclair Wood – Images of a Spiritual Journey

50 years Reunion Newcastle Art School -Lynne Wood – student 1969-72 (Lynne died 2012)

By Susan Kinneally      August 2012

Lynne was a child of the 1950’s. She lived in dun coloured, dreary suburban Newcastle, dreaming of another world; a different reality populated with the fairies and spiritual beings of her Grandfather’s stories (he was affectionately known as ‘Old Jack’). She slept with the moon on her face, defying her mother’s prophesy that she would go ‘mad’, and took for granted that the fairies had left her the books and paint brushes she found under her pillow (never just a threepenny bit for a baby tooth). She loved to paint and draw these beings, but only shared her images with Old Jack and her Dad, fearing derision from the rigid expectations of the teachers at Primary school. These were special creatures that she created, ones with special meanings, not to be disparaged by the unsympathetic or ignorant. In High School she found the rich colours and patterns of Klimt, the Pre-Raphaelites, Art Nouveau, the novels of the Bronte sisters and the intellectual challenge of Modern Art to be compelling. Ancient History was also to became a guiding passion in her life. She delighted in wearing richly coloured velvet robes; her long wavy tresses would surely have been the envy of a Rosetti maiden.

At Art School in the 1970’s she found more in the way of opposition to her ways of making art, but Lynne stuck to her guns. Straight masking tape edges and ‘field painting’ was never going to be her style.

She spent some time as the art teacher at Temora High in the NSW countryside, where she lived in a shared household with other young teachers. Rock and roll and wild parties were crazy fun but bushwalking awoke in her an awareness of the ancient spirit of the land. Here Lynne began to produce work that reflected her sensitive response to landscape. Her painting and drawing at this time has a rhythmic sensuousness and begins to suggest that innate understanding that Lynne expressed throughout her career, the sense of “my female body being one with the earth and the elements of nature.” Even so, Lynne felt deeply that her ancestral roots belonged on the other side of the world, in Wales and Scotland.

Western NSW was not enough for Lynne, who enrolled herself at Adelaide University in the late 1970’s to do a Fine Arts degree. Here Lynne exhibited with the Women’s Art Movement at the ‘Exhibition Space’; a work which comprised an empty room filled with purple mist, where people were encouraged to meditate. Photos suggest an ethereal otherworldliness. The Experimental Art Foundation at the Jam Factory was another intriguing artspace, where Lynne learned of the earth and body installation and performance work that was going on in Britain, Ireland and other parts of Europe. In 1980 an inheritance gave her a chance to live and study in Great Britain.

She wanted to explore, to find meanings, to experience something of the places she had read and dreamed about. The stories of her Grandfather were buried deep in her psyche.

There followed years pursuing those instincts, meeting with inspiring people, studying Celtic culture while losing herself in the ‘sacred landscape of my ancestors’ and being part of the emerging feminist goddess movement. Discussing shamanism with Joseph Beuys and talking with Monica Sjoo about body and spirit were energising, exciting.

Lynne lived in Wales and Scotland for four years, connecting with artists producing work exploring Celtic ideas in creative work. In 1983 Lynne worked at the UNESCO World Rock Art Centre in Valcamonica, collating the work of people studying ancient rock art worldwide. The common elements between symbolic rock carvings in indigenous cultures interested Lynne as a possible point of understanding between European and Indigenous Australians.

After returning to Australia in 1984, Lynne headed to Uluru and the Central Desert, spending a year producing vibrant images of the light and colour of the landscape. The aboriginal women she met spoke of their oneness with the land, giving Lynne a deeper understanding of the importance of place. The artworks she made show “this notion of my body and the earth as one, here within the Australian landscape”.

     “Katajuta” 1984, pastel on paper.

These artworks were exhibited as part of a larger exhibition in London in 1985, and complemented by drawings of sacred sites in Britain.

          “Stonehenge” 1985, pastel on watercolour paper.

Lynne also presented a ritual performance piece using her body, paint powder and fabric, weaving a triple ‘spiral’ pattern of the elements.

Other extraordinary installations included the notable “StandingStones of Callanish”, presented at the Adelaide Festival Centre Gallery in 1986. This beautiful exhibition comprised thirteen large vertical pastel drawings representing each stone that makes up the ancient stone circle at Callanish, on the Hebridean island of Lewis. As well, the installation included a large 1.5 metre drawing of the whole complex. The drawings, when individually lit, created a powerful atmosphere within the gallery.

During the 1990’s Lynne taught Celtic culture and spirituality through workshops and courses, and published a book “Creating form from the Mist: the Wisdom of Women in Celtic Myth and Culture” . She published numerous articles in journals and anthologies on topics ranging from Celtic culture, women in Buddhism and Goddess traditions.

Also during the 1990’s she led tours of ancient sacred places in Ireland and Britain. Lynne’s incredible personal knowledge and enthusiasm lent these trips a deeply satisfying and inspiring edge.

Researching spiritual traditions across cultures was Lynne’s life work and greatest passion. Her art reflects this passionate centre, her ability to use colour and symbol to communicate her deep immersion in the worlds of symbol and meanings. Her work is sensitive, delicate and strong and manages to convey a kind of monumental tenderness. They achieve what Lynne had hoped for I think…a powerful expression of womanly spirituality.

Sinclar-Wood 45026, 10/11/08, 11:28 AM, 8C, 6000×8000 (0+0), 100%, Repro 2.2 v2, 1/20 s, R112.5, G77.9, B80.7

‘Callanish Gateway by Day” pastel on watercolour paper, 2007

Sinclar-Wood 44305, 27/10/08, 12:55 PM, 8C, 5976×8000 (16+0), 100%, Repro 2.2 v2, 1/15 s, R106.3, G71.9, B73.5

“Ancestral Bones on Callanish” pastel on watercolour paper 2007

(these paintings refer to Lynne’s experience of the lunar ‘standstill’ on June, 2006.)

                 “Self Portrait with Guardian” pastel on watercolour paper 2007

(her Guardian was her much loved cat, Grainne)

Untitled, 26/10/11, 3:22 PM, 16C, 6000×8000 (0+0), 100%, Custom, 1/15 s, R63.3, G9.0, B16.5

   “Ancestral Window 1: Scotland/Wales: Lobethal Bush, South Australia”2008 (Portals between worlds).

Lynne had a Master of Arts from the University of Adelaide, a Fine Arts degree from the University of South Australia and a Diploma of Art Education from the National Art School, Sydney.

Susan Kinneally

Susan trained with Lynne Sinclair-Wood at Newcastle in the early 1970’s and remained a friend. She has had a full time career as an art teacher in Victoria and has written a number of articles for Art Education Victoria. She also wrote “Happy as Larry”, about the art and work of Pamela Irving, published in 2008. Susan is presently working on her lifetime ambition to become a full time painter and ceramicist.

Lynne Sinclair Wood

Born 29th November 1950. Died 12th January 2011

Lynne was born in New South Wales but made Adelaide her home from the 1980s.  She held a Master of Arts from the University of Adelaide, a Fine Arts degree from the University of South Australia and a Diploma of Art Education from the National Art School, (Newcastle).  Her painting was largely influenced by her “life long spiritual journey as a Celtic Australian woman searching for her own sacred space: here in Australia, in her ancestral lands of Scotland and Wales and within her own mind, spirit and imagination.

Lynne pursued her art in Australia and Europe over 4 decades. For her it was also a spiritual journey, and one that inspired many people that she came onto contact with.

Her last years were lived with a cancer that eventually took her life in 2011

Copies of Lynne’s art and wrtings are held in the Women’s Art Register, Richmond Library, Melbourne Victoria. Website:http://www.womensartregister.org

Vale – 50yrs Reunion – No longer with us


Some students who have died:

Isis Maria Sobetzco

John Mudge

Lynne Wood 1950 – 2011

As a friend of Lynne and holder of copyright of her online images I will be presenting some information about Lynne’s art and life.

If you would like me to add information about your friends or link to another site, please email me the details. barbara.aroney@gmail.com

Isis Maria Sobetzco